That whole pesky mosque issue

I just don't get people.

But first, some fact-checking is in order. How far from "ground zero" is the "mosque"? Well, it's actually a little over two city blocks. And, here's the interesting thing: muslims already meet and pray there. Oh, and it's not really a mosque; it's a community center with space set aside for prayer, sort of like the Y.

That stuff's important, because the wing nuts who are politicizing this issue are calling it "the ground zero mosque" not because that's actually what it is, but because they're trying to unify their base of ignorant dipshits by rallying prejudice against a religious minority, conflating "Muslim" – of whom there are millions of peaceful practitioners here in the United States – with poisonous terms like "Al Queda", "Bin Laden", and "9/11". Nevermind the fact that among the roughly 3,000 killed in 9/11, a number of them were peaceful Muslims.

This all speaks to a bigger issue though: religious freedom. It's funny how the conservative right think the constitution is really just sort of a "guideline", with first amendment rights being stripped from people who aren't in the majority when said majority deems their activities to be in poor taste. The reality is that building this Muslim community center is every bit as protected a religious freedom as any other, and those who would mask their bigotry with the thin veil of reverence toward 9/11 victims are precisely the kinds of people who remind us why we have a constitution in the first place: to protect the liberties of all Americans, not just the ones you like.

The conservative right's reaction to this issue is offensive to anyone with a modicum of rational good sense. The flagrant disregard for the constitutionally protected freedoms of all Americans is offensive, as is the continual distortion of facts to serve petty political agendas that pander to the darkest corners of our human nature.

It's eerie how much this mirrors the gay rights issue in one critical way: wing nuts really wish that the fourteenth amendment to our constitution did not exist:

"All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws."

Comments

Popular Posts