07 July 2012

An interesting perspective on fine-tuning

I really just wanted to re-post this from Debunking Christianity, where a user by the moniker D Rizdek had a great comment on this thread. It's a unique perspective on the old fine-tuning canard that I've never heard before, and I'm only going to add to it with a little topical self-promotion. Anyway, here's the quote:

Fine tuning only makes sense if there is no god. If there is no god, then it is quite remarkable that all the universal constants seem to be "just so" such that matter/energy comes together in atoms, then molecules, that gravity is "just right" so that planets and suns form that give off light that nurtures life, blah blah. But that's only remarkable if there's no god. But of course that indicates there's no god.

If there IS a god, then it's all mundane. It's all arbitrary. Matter and energy can behave anyway this god wants it to. There need be no universal constants at all, or they can be ANYTHING this god desires, because,well, it's god. God can design things any it want's to. Life need not have a planet it live on IF god designed it otherwise. Matter/energy need not come together to form atoms, planets and stars. What would be the point if life doesn't need them. Besides, if god wanted atoms, planets or start, they'd just appear without any constants. Because that's what gods do. It's only after applying human limitations on god that one can use the argument from fine tuning. The reasoning is that because WE are limited in how we must interact with the immutable physical universe, somehow the theist becomes ingrained in thinking their god must also be thus limited. They believe he must come up with "just so" constants otherwise nothing would work.

Giant gas cloud in lifeless void, clearly proving the universe was designed to support life

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.